Sucklers aborting

Samcowman

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
One of ours was 3 days after Tb test
That’ll do it. Have had 3 abort this year so far. 1 after Tb test, 1 in the autumn in the heifers after being loaded up from their away block and one just before Tb test. Took bloods from her as the vet was here for the test and came back with nothing.
 

Gulli

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Somerset
One of ours was 3 days after Tb test
We used to get the odd one or two, always 2/3 weeks after the herd test. Which I assume was just enough stress to make them drop the foetus
Herd test is closer to calving now due to a breakdown and we haven't had one slip a calf in the last 3 years
 

Extreme Optimist

Member
Livestock Farmer
Off the top of my head, I would say the biggest cause of abortion here would be twins. I know this isn’t the OP’s case but just saying.
Totally agree. I would say about 80% of my still births/abortions over the years have been twins. I always mark down on the software the cause of death of still born calves and it is shocking to look at the list. It is just twin after twin.
 

Extreme Optimist

Member
Livestock Farmer
Watched a Webianar the other eve: Managing fertility in the suckler cow run by SAC. Unfortunately, I can't find a link. They suggested that 85% of abortions in the beef suckler herd are diet related. Poor silage, soil contamination etc. The worst offendor was Bacillus licheniformis. In contrast, in the dairy herd, it was almost all BVD, Salomella, Neospora, Listeria etc. Which I guess means that Dairy farmers make better silage (or at least less contaminated) silage than beef farmers. It was also suggested that the chances of conclusive lab tests was only about 25 - 30%!!
 

dannewhouse

Member
Location
huddersfield
I had one abort a couple of years ago...then 8 weeks later it had a healthy live calf
You give me hope for the first abortion.
The one yesterday/today with twins put down to twins and wave bye to the cow just incase it neospora or anything else in that cow.
Could be silage but I would hope not
2nd year seeds bales 4 layer wrap horse quality hayladge!
 

marco

Member
You give me hope for the first abortion.
The one yesterday/today with twins put down to twins and wave bye to the cow just incase it neospora or anything else in that cow.
Could be silage but I would hope not
2nd year seeds bales 4 layer wrap horse quality hayladge!
There might be a clue in my suggestion for seaweed licks. It could be iodine deficiency or one of the other micro nutrients in seaweed.

Are they all in the one group?

If not, could try it on one group
 

dannewhouse

Member
Location
huddersfield
There might be a clue in my suggestion for seaweed licks. It could be iodine deficiency or one of the other micro nutrients in seaweed.

Are they all in the one group?

If not, could try it on one group
No there's 3 groups, twins from the middle group the earlier one from the left
 

Treecreeper

Member
Livestock Farmer
Test the next one, could be one of those things, could be something serious.
Had a Tb test recently?
When we had a Tb outbreak a few years back and on 60 day testing could just about guarantee an abortion or early calf within a short time after testing.
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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