College options for a keen lad.

Aye up,

My lad is in his first year of a Level 3 Extended Diploma. He’s doing ok, really well in fact, good grades and we thought he was enjoying it.

I know it’s been a difficult year for many kids, but he’s been lucky, really busy working on a local farm. He absolutely loves it and is there every minute he can be.

In the last few weeks his head has gone down a bit when it comes to college. If we let him, he would not bother going again. We want him to last the course and get the qualification. He doesn’t want to do a degree, which is frustrating because we’re sure he could, but we don’t rule with a rod here, they’ve got to make their own way.

The fact he’s not doing a degree makes him
think the diploma is pointless, but we’re trying to get him to see further.

What options could he have to do something different next year?

We’re adamant he should do something with a qualification at the end. The trouble is he loves “the work”. It’s all he wants to do. He doesn’t want to tell people how to do the work, he just loves doing it himself. And when older he’s adamant he’s going to have his own business (or mine!!!) so won’t need to impress anybody with a piece of paper. All good stuff but we don’t want him to regret it later.

He could do with something to really grab him next year, give him a really interesting challenge.

Any ideas?

Cheers, Pete.
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
Do you need a degree to be a farm manager?
I don't see much point in college to work on a farm or go contracting, unless its to put your wage up. like the old craftsman rate.
Better to get a trade in my opinion, so he can set up on his own.
Mechanic, welder, builder etc He could still do farm work while he learns.
 

Mur Huwcun

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North West Wales
This year has not been a normal year has it, hopefully next year will be getting closer to being one and he can enjoy more of the college life and hopefully some visits, tours etc etc
 

silverfox

Member
Location
Shropshire
I was made to finish a course I didn’t want to by my dad and I resented him for a a good while after for it
Depends on your path, but it’s helped my two enormously and both have very good jobs in their 20s.
My son would’ve left school at 16 to jump on a tractor, but was cajoled to stay on and got a degree from Harper. He’s now farm manager on a 6000 acre mixed estate at 29. Daughter at 26 has just been promoted to head of farm491 at RAU. Neither would’ve got far without the paper work, even if you don’t actually use what you did the degree in. Daughters was Geography . It’s not for everyone though, especially if your going home .
 

Renaultman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Darlington
My Son was always destined for uni, he's clever enough, all his mates went but after his A levels he said he didn't want to go. He travelled a little bit and came home, not to work on the farm but that's where he is now. He was never farm or tractor daft but seems to enjoy it, sub contracts out to local farms if needed, does a fair few agriculture related courses and has done a business management apprenticeship, which was ideal as only day release, and even better it was government supported.
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
How old is he? The very least he needs to do is get away from home for a while and work, ideally including some time abroad. You’re well enough respected on here to be able to help him with this if you want to.
No harm in him having a year or two away from full time education, but he needs to learn the importance of practical tickets which are only a step away from a formal qualification.
 
If you get a qualification - of any kind really- all it signifies is that you can apply yourself to a project , and bring it to a recognised conclusion . I went for an interview for a job just a few weeks before I sat my final exams . He offered me the job , and I asked whether it was conditional on passing . No, it isn't , said he , but for your own satisfaction , it would be better if you passed . I honestly don't think that my qualifications have helped me , or even been of practical use to me , neither in that job , nor afterwards . I did however manage to find myself a wife in Ag. College - a farmer's daughter too - and we had 60 odd years of a true 50/50 partnership marriage , so I considered it all well worth while .
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
Depends on your path, but it’s helped my two enormously and both have very good jobs in their 20s.
My son would’ve left school at 16 to jump on a tractor, but was cajoled to stay on and got a degree from Harper. He’s now farm manager on a 6000 acre mixed estate at 29. Daughter at 26 has just been promoted to head of farm491 at RAU. Neither would’ve got far without the paper work, even if you don’t actually use what you did the degree in. Daughters was Geography . It’s not for everyone though, especially if your going home .
I'd agree with you about the degree but the OP's son isn't doing one so I'm not sure Ag college is much use. It may have have changed since I was young but Reasheath was mostly full of farmers son's just putting in time until the pubs were open at levels below degree.
I think he'd be better off learning to be a mechanic or engineer, on the machine side or something like shearing or foot trimming on the livestock side.
 

wdah/him

Member
Location
tyrone
My Son was always destined for uni, he's clever enough, all his mates went but after his A levels he said he didn't want to go. He travelled a little bit and came home, not to work on the farm but that's where he is now. He was never farm or tractor daft but seems to enjoy it, sub contracts out to local farms if needed, does a fair few agriculture related courses and has done a business management apprenticeship, which was ideal as only day release, and even better it was government supported.
more or less he is doing what tickles his fancy, where he is happy.

I was pushed to a comprehensive scholl and then after 5th year did a few nvq l2 and 3 in engineering and also livestock production. How i have ended up as a maintence techneican in a food factory i will never know but now am looking for a course to match it and sharpen up my skills on the electronic side. Funny thing is i thought about electronics but didnt like the idea of a full time course but liked making things.

Part I hate the most, doing the comprehensive school, forced to and hated it dont think i have any friends from it that i see often, maybe on a night out.

Id say let him sort himself out, everybody has to make their own mistakes and choices, its thier life and if you are interested in what you are doing that is all that u need to learn.
 

farmboy

Member
Location
Dorset
I regret not going on and doing my degree, had good enough A levels to have got on to any I wanted but was adamant I wanted to start work. There’s a long time to work. The contacts and the experience would make it worthwhile alone
 

SteveHants

Member
Livestock Farmer
I'm glad it hasn't affected his placements, we've had a few struggle.

Could he talk to the careers service at college - you seem not far from us - where is he studying?

I've had a number of opportunities suitable for college leaders drop on my lap. He could train to do the TB test if he's interested in cows and seeing other farms....
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

  • 195
  • 0
Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
Top