Extra costs for pedigree bulls

how much extra to produce and sell a pedigree bull V commercial steer at 18 months ?

  • under £100

  • £100 to £250

  • £251 to £500

  • £501 to £1000

  • £1001 to £2000

  • over £2000


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Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
By that reckoning being a member of a breed society and paying a registration fee could be classed as an unnecessary cost as well...
It could though I spose it keeps a better breeding record than you can get off CTS ? And the animal is not classed as pedigree without it
Not that I want to see society sales stop particularly or any other way of selling

We have sold most of our bulls from home making it cheaper to sell them than the commercial stores that are mostly sold at market
 
It could though I spose it keeps a better breeding record than you can get off CTS ? And the animal is not classed as pedigree without it
Not that I want to see society sales stop particularly or any other way of selling

We have sold most of our bulls from home making it cheaper to sell them than the commercial stores that are mostly sold at market
Why does the thread title ask how much extra it costs to produce a bull over a commercial when yours are less?
 

Agrivator

Member
It could though I spose it keeps a better breeding record than you can get off CTS ? And the animal is not classed as pedigree without it
Not that I want to see society sales stop particularly or any other way of selling

We have sold most of our bulls from home making it cheaper to sell them than the commercial stores that are mostly sold at market
Why does the thread title ask how much extra it costs to produce a bull over a commercial when yours are less?
Maybe he means that you pay commission and transport if you sell commercial stores at market. But those costs don't apply to a bull sold at home.

Unless you offer to deliver and/or give a guarantee or a lot of luck......................

How long have you been a farmer??
 
Maybe he means that you pay commission and transport if you sell commercial stores at market. But those costs don't apply to a bull sold at home.

Unless you offer to deliver and/or give a guarantee or a lot of luck......................

How long have you been a farmer??
If selling breeding stock from home, why not sell commercial stores from home.

How long have you not had any imagination?
 

Agrivator

Member
If selling breeding stock from home, why not sell commercial stores from home.

How long have you not had any imagination?
The difficulty with selling stores from home is that there is a risk of the buyer defaulting on payment. That's why it's usually safer to sell though an Auction Mart, either privately or publicly at auction.

A breeding bull is different. A single bull at £3000 is a much lower risk than 10 stores at £1100. And anyway, if we sell stores from home, we don't get the satisfaction of topping the £/kg in the mart's report.
 
The difficulty with selling stores from home is that there is a risk of the buyer defaulting on payment. That's why it's usually safer to sell though an Auction Mart, either privately or publicly at auction.

A breeding bull is different. A single bull at £3000 is a much lower risk than 10 stores at £1100. And anyway, if we sell stores from home, we don't get the satisfaction of topping the £/kg in the mart's report.
I've not found it to be a problem and I've sold 50 to 60 that way several times, just don't deal with dodgy people and you'll be fine.
How long have you been selling cattle?

Ps. From what I've noticed you'll need the £/kg to make up for the lack of Kgs
 
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Matt

Member
ive often wondered what would be the accepted position of a breeder who sells a bull who the buyer subsequently claims the bull is no good.

we have had it once before where a good repeat customer chap claimed he didnt think the bull had stopped many, but we had used him as a sweeper following ai and had a heifer in calf to him we offered him another one at killing money and he kept the other bull too as he couldn't come back due to tb.

just wondered what others would do if someone says bull no good?
 
ive often wondered what would be the accepted position of a breeder who sells a bull who the buyer subsequently claims the bull is no good.

we have had it once before where a good repeat customer chap claimed he didnt think the bull had stopped many, but we had used him as a sweeper following ai and had a heifer in calf to him we offered him another one at killing money and he kept the other bull too as he couldn't come back due to tb.

just wondered what others would do if someone says bull no good?
This why I think that those who sell bulls at a few quid over beef money are daft.

Personally I'd ask for a semen test and video of a bulling cow that he cannot serve before I'd consider reimbursement.

With a regular customer that you trust it may be a different case.
 

Matt

Member
This why I think that those who sell bulls at a few quid over beef money are daft.

Personally I'd ask for a semen test and video of a bulling cow that he cannot serve before I'd consider reimbursement.

With a regular customer that you trust it may be a different case.
sensible approach.
I took our chap at his word as he was a regular customer. thought couldn't be fairer than that.
 

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