New Chaser bin anyone, what would you pull it with ?

Robt

Member
Location
Suffolk
It’s a field bin and very efficient too! Sometimes what we do in the UK with 4 Fendt 724’s at 120k each 480k, four 20k trailers , 80k, 4 pairs of ray bans and Schoffel fleece, to drive them, priceless.... it’s all about economies of scale! It’ll be dragged by road with a magnum or similar. Same magnum will pull the 40t chaser in tracks... combine will harvest 40t every 2 hours....
 
It’s a field bin and very efficient too! Sometimes what we do in the UK with 4 Fendt 724’s at 120k each 480k, four 20k trailers , 80k, 4 pairs of ray bans and Schoffel fleece, to drive them, priceless.... it’s all about economies of scale! It’ll be dragged by road with a magnum or similar. Same magnum will pull the 40t chaser in tracks... combine will harvest 40t every 2 hours....
err, we can easily be pulling off over 60 tonne an hour with one machine . . .
Couple of machines working together, no trouble pulling off 100 tonne an hour

field bin tractor stays on field bin all the time, so trucks can load & go without any delay.
Chaser bin tractor stays on the chaser bin as the header ( combine ) doesn’t stop . . .

most chaser bins are around 25 - 30 tonne ( legal load for a single trailer truck is roughly 26 t ). Any bigger, they start to get too heavy to be dragging around
Most have a 20” unloading auger
 
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farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
Its a self unloading shed on wheels... no planning permission required, its tractor towable and thus already insured for nothing under the tractor policy, once air temp drops grain will cool quickly, its equipment and thus more tax efficient than a shed, for tenant farmers is a no brainer, by all measures its genius... How many tonnes and how much is it...
 
Thanks, when I was in oz back in 98 it was slower
depends a lot on what part of Australia & what crop also.
very big variations across the whole country

even in the same farm we can have very big yield variations depending on the season

some of the best / fastest / highest tonnes per hour harvesting is in good crops of grain sorghum. High yielding & only taking in the heads, so can really push the capacity . . .
 
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as long as it could physically pull it when empty, probably.
most just tend to have some cheap shitty old tractor on the front to move them & run the PTO. No point having money tied up in having another expensive tractor on it.
Mate of mine used to have a Ford 5000 on his 80 t Dunstan

if you look at some of my pics on the next page, you'll see some old Inter tractor that I'm not even sure of the model, on my bin
 
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Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Its a self unloading shed on wheels... no planning permission required, its tractor towable and thus already insured for nothing under the tractor policy, once air temp drops grain will cool quickly, its equipment and thus more tax efficient than a shed, for tenant farmers is a no brainer, by all measures its genius... How many tonnes and how much is it...
That one holds 110t. No idea on price.

Don't fancy trying to move it on UK roads was bad enough out there.
 
Its a self unloading shed on wheels... no planning permission required, its tractor towable and thus already insured for nothing under the tractor policy, once air temp drops grain will cool quickly, its equipment and thus more tax efficient than a shed, for tenant farmers is a no brainer, by all measures its genius... How many tonnes and how much is it...
haha - it’s a lot more expensive than a shed though. For comparison, I bought my 80 t Vennings in 1998 for $36K. That same year, I bought a brand new Landcruiser HZJ75 ute for $36K & a brand new John Deere 8 metre MaxEmerge precision vacuum meter double disc planter with ALL the bells & whistles at the time for $48K. The equivalent Toyota today would cost about $60 - 70K, the Vennings at least $100k
About 10 years ago I built a 700 tonne Twister silo, concrete base, aeration floor & fan, outloading & sweep auger. That cost about $70K
But that’s not the point. They are just temporary paddock storage between the harvesting operation & the transport of the grain to more permanent storage ( sometimes we will store grain for years ). In my 100 t / hour example above, the bin might be filled & emptied 10 or more times a day
It is so chaser bins aren’t held up waiting for trucks, & trucks don’t have to waste time just sitting in the paddock. Ultimately, it’s all about the combine never stopping . . .
 
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Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
I’ve started threads before about mother bins, always been surprised we don’t use them in the UK as surely a better solution for logistics at harvest than big numbers of cart tractors on long hauls ?

i did consider building one last year to use on a contract farm but land owner has decided to invest in a store
 
I am only cropping 800 hectares, in one location, so the absolute furthest we are carting to my own storage is about 4km
The nearest GrainCorp sites are about 4 & 16km away from my farm. But they don't accept all of the varying crops I grow, only really the basic wheat / barley / sorghum. We are a bit more diverse than that . . .
Admittedly, when I bought the bin, I was also farming some land with no storage & about 30km from home, so that’s where it really came into it’s own.
However, even the short distances at home, the bin still proves its worth. With just 1 combine working, it means I can have one truck constantly carting, instead of 2 trucks, having to wait to be filled.
But, I wouldn’t like to move them around on UK roads, it’s bad enough here on back roads with lots of space & no traffic. I certainly wouldn't like it on a busy road ( biggest problem is too slow. Not good travelling at 20km / hr when everyone else is doing 110 !!! )
 
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JJT

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Cumbria
do the truck drivers start and stop them when filling or is there an extra person needed to work it?
 

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