Recovering land after deep ploughing

Richard Budd

Member
Location
Kent
Part of an estate we have taken on has been deep ploughed over the winter (circa 350mm) ready for vines, this is now looking as if it is going to fall out of bed and we are going to farm it along with the rest of the estate. Problem is the top soil is currently buried, my thought is to consolidate what has been done and then turn it back over, if were to do this what sort of size plough body would we need?? It has been done with a specialist deep vineyard plough in the first place. I attach a picture of the current destruction....
IMG_2731.jpg
 
Part of an estate we have taken on has been deep ploughed over the winter (circa 350mm) ready for vines, this is now looking as if it is going to fall out of bed and we are going to farm it along with the rest of the estate. Problem is the top soil is currently buried, my thought is to consolidate what has been done and then turn it back over, if were to do this what sort of size plough body would we need?? It has been done with a specialist deep vineyard plough in the first place. I attach a picture of the current destruction....View attachment 1019571
Looks like my uncles standard ploughing
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Not sure ploughing that deep inverts it completely, i would power harrow and drill.. on some of my clay there is some nice silt below 24", getting it to the top would mean redraining.
 
If they have brought a lot of rock up reburying it may be difficult

when at college the soil science depment took use to see a field that some clever bod had deep ploughed without digging enough holes to see what was under the topsoil

the only crop the land was suitable for was grass

modern notill techniques may be able to crop rocky ground

keeping the topsoil on the top is essential for good soil management

deep ploughing on clay land bringing up clay to mix with top soil has ruined many heavy land farms and can ruin drainage
subsoiling without mixing is far more effective if there are no shallow drains
 

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
Level it sow some grass/wild flower seed ......leave well alone and see what it looks like in 10 years time......the risk/reward for trying to crop that with fert at current levels must be dubious
I'd say there were 3 options,
as @z.man suggests
plant with vines
plaster with muck and grow mustard or rye to plough back some organic matter.

Pretty flowers would be my choice.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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