Sick beans

robin banks

Member
Location
Ireland
IMG-20210603-WA0002.jpg


Friend of mine has asked what's happening to his spring beans. The photo above shows the start of what seems to kill the bean. It is affecting the whole field. His first taught was spray drift from a neighbour. But agronomist says that whole field would not be affected. As it's a funny shape field. It was doing well but suddenly is disappearing. Any ideas. Crop had slurry ploughed in before sowing. And has not been sprayed yet.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Not been sprayed yet? So no residual herbicide. But to me that looks like uptake of some sort of herbicide maybe from the previous crop. The recent rains have caused ours to suck up a bit of preem, but nothing serious.
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
Fusarium foot rot, I had a similar experience, established well, looked good, and then in hot June weather it started to die off, literally the whole field.
Ditto for me. Not sure it looked like that though, although it was 16 years ago.
When did the field last have peas or beans?
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
my first thoughts was DFF, was the field in cereals that received DFF last spring?
You say it had slurry so could it be forefront carried through in the slurry from the grass,
I'd have thought it would show twisting if it was though.

Also dig up some plants and carefully was off the roots to see what they look like.
 

robin banks

Member
Location
Ireland
Sorry meant to say it had a pre emerge the day after sowing. Don't know which one but think stomp. I know the agronomist recommended whatever was used. I was in field tonight and it was sprayed tonight with a folior feed and seaweed trace element to try and pick it back up. But think it's no use a very nice crop looks dead. Personally I think it's something like forefront silage fed to cattle and the roots are now getting down into it or maybe some other spray. The land was in long-term ley. Got a really heavy dose of slurry before ploughing probably 5000 gal an acre of thick cow slurry. First crop of beans ever. Really good even crop. And disappearing quickly.
Agronomist looked at the roots and says they are healthy. It's dieing from top down.
IMG-20210603-WA0003.jpg
 

robin banks

Member
Location
Ireland
Just spoke to my friend. Field was sprayed with forefront 4 years ago. And D50 two years ago. Can't be certain would about the slurry being from silage that had been sprayed with forefront.
He walked the crop Monday Evening and taught it looked really well. Wednesday evening he could see it was dieing. This evening it's really bad. Crop had been 12 inches tall on Monday. This evening it's about 4. There was a patch that looked good yesterday and even that is starting to die today.
 

Flat 10

Member
Location
Fen Edge
Sorry meant to say it had a pre emerge the day after sowing. Don't know which one but think stomp. I know the agronomist recommended whatever was used. I was in field tonight and it was sprayed tonight with a folior feed and seaweed trace element to try and pick it back up. But think it's no use a very nice crop looks dead. Personally I think it's something like forefront silage fed to cattle and the roots are now getting down into it or maybe some other spray. The land was in long-term ley. Got a really heavy dose of slurry before ploughing probably 5000 gal an acre of thick cow slurry. First crop of beans ever. Really good even crop. And disappearing quickly.
Agronomist looked at the roots and says they are healthy. It's dieing from top down. View attachment 965365
Why do you put 5000gal/ac cow slurry on beans?
 

Flatlander

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lorette Manitoba
Neighbour here had crops struggling after slurry application. He put it down to a contractor rinsing his sprayer out in his yard a few times throughout the season and that water was added to the lagoon. Nothing as major as that thou.
 

Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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