A new diet regime for a farmer

JP1

Member
Livestock Farmer
So I got through the 20 pages to date on this thread:


A lot to read , some conflicting advice (as with any other learning source) and it got me thinking, like everyone else I have to have three meals a day and what I should be doing to improve my diet , BMI and reduce future health risks as I approach 60

I'm reasonably active in that I do a lot of manual livestock related tasks out of working hours, I work full time and I guess my fitness levels have dropped off a bit as I am no longer a retained firefighter

Time for cooking is at a premium in that I come in from day work, often eat and go straight back out to works. I have toast or cereals for breakfast (again I usually do stock work first, then quick breakfast, then get to the office by 7/8am). Lunch is usually sandwiches at my desk

I feel the time is right to plan my meals ahead more carefully

So where to start?

I know it's pretty elementary but we all become creatures of habit and I'm probably one of them
 

JP1

Member
Livestock Farmer
IMO eating clean is the only way,

If every food you eat only contains one ingredient, you are of to a good start (very hard to do though)

There's a girl "buffbunny" on Youtube, she has some fantastic meal preps about clean eating.
With a name like that I know at least one of the Mods will be doing some research - strictly in the interests of a clean diet of course
 

DKnD

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Exmoor
Have a look at the 'Nutracheck' app.
Bad things: Its a calorie counting app and you gotta pay for it.
Good things: its easy to use, it shows you quite quickly how good or bad whatever your eating actually is.
 

Bald Rick

Moderator
Livestock Farmer
Location
Anglesey
Attack is the best form of defence 🤣🤣🤣

Well @JP1 was right though ….

just look at those buns. Good enough to eat

1646736669005.jpeg
 

primmiemoo

Member
Location
Devon
Reasonably simple to eat a wide range of food, not much carbohydrate (whole grain, and flour that's slow milled to retain micronutrients), any added sugar at homeopathic levels only, natural fat, and as much food fresh and prepared from scratch as possible. Loads of scope for treats, obviously, but read the ingredients list. Fewest ingredients the better. "Clean" eating is a bit puritanical for my taste.

Serving method matters, imv. At the moment, lambing time means enough physical activity to warrant the big 1990s plates from the cupboard, but for much of year, the Edwardian sized plates are more appropriate as measures for portion control. Clearing a full, small plate is satisfying, especially when seconds are an important part of life, iyswim.
 
I think the biggest thing we can do is cut out sugar, reduce refined grains and I am going to try to cut out cooking or frying in rapeseed oil too (when I have finished the bottle in the larder). My biggest achilleas heel is biscuits, cake and chocolate. I think the comment above, about trying to only eat stuff without an ingredients list on the packet is a good idea. Reading too, that we should be eating more offal as well.

I have found the five two diet really good too.

Forget BMI (it does not account for farmers with muscles), rather measure circumference round the middle (at the biggest point), rule of thumb it should be less than 37" and ideally half your height.
 
Location
Ceredigion
So I got through the 20 pages to date on this thread:


A lot to read , some conflicting advice (as with any other learning source) and it got me thinking, like everyone else I have to have three meals a day and what I should be doing to improve my diet , BMI and reduce future health risks as I approach 60

I'm reasonably active in that I do a lot of manual livestock related tasks out of working hours, I work full time and I guess my fitness levels have dropped off a bit as I am no longer a retained firefighter

Time for cooking is at a premium in that I come in from day work, often eat and go straight back out to works. I have toast or cereals for breakfast (again I usually do stock work first, then quick breakfast, then get to the office by 7/8am). Lunch is usually sandwiches at my desk

I feel the time is right to plan my meals ahead more carefully

So where to start?

I know it's pretty elementary but we all become creatures of habit and I'm probably one of them
Your eating to much bread ,hope it's not white
 

topground

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North Somerset.
I had twelve weeks on the slimming world programme free via my local surgery 5 years ago, lost 14 kg and kept most of it off.
Still on a version of it now.
Bread and cake is now a rare treat. Lots of fruit and veg. The slow cooker and the freezer is your friend for preprepared meals from scratch then 20 minutes tops to microwave heat, cook the veg and rice or pasta whatever goes with the dish.
It suits me living on my own most of the time. The killer for me is beer, particularly during the rugby season but there are limits to self denial!
 

fgc325j

Member
I think the biggest thing we can do is cut out sugar, reduce refined grains and I am going to try to cut out cooking or frying in rapeseed oil too (when I have finished the bottle in the larder). My biggest achilleas heel is biscuits, cake and chocolate. I think the comment above, about trying to only eat stuff without an ingredients list on the packet is a good idea. Reading too, that we should be eating more offal as well.

I have found the five two diet really good too.

Forget BMI (it does not account for farmers with muscles), rather measure circumference round the middle (at the biggest point), rule of thumb it should be less than 37" and ideally half your height.
Mmm! - let'see, i'm 5' 6" i.e short arse model - so my waist should be 33"- 'kin 'ell i need to lose 7". NOW - if i could add those 7" to a certain part of my anatomy - i would have a bright future in porn!.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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