Are large livestock markets a problem?

Bigguy

New Member
I think we all can agree that it's hugely important that we should all support auction markets for the sake our industry. We constantly hear from the lla and auctioneers that deadweight are the enemy and going that way will kill the trade which I agree with to some extent but I have been noticing recently how aggressively the larger auctions try and procure their stock from further afield and generally away from smaller local markets. I do some haulage and am now travelling many miles to big marts because they offer attractive deals often undercutting smaller local places on commission and even paying for the haulage. Could we get to the point of a few huge centres and lose the smaller ones because they can't compete. And should the big boys pay some consideration to who they are poaching from if they really believe in sell live and thrive?
 

casper74

Member
Location
North Yorkshire
I think we all can agree that it's hugely important that we should all support auction markets for the sake our industry. We constantly hear from the lla and auctioneers that deadweight are the enemy and going that way will kill the trade which I agree with to some extent but I have been noticing recently how aggressively the larger auctions try and procure their stock from further afield and generally away from smaller local markets. I do some haulage and am now travelling many miles to big marts because they offer attractive deals often undercutting smaller local places on commission and even paying for the haulage. Could we get to the point of a few huge centres and lose the smaller ones because they can't compete. And should the big boys pay some consideration to who they are poaching from if they really believe in sell live and thrive?
Marts paying for haulage!!!! now I wonder which mart that could be🤔🤔
 

andybk

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Mendips Somerset
I still miss Banbury.
Im still shocked that no one really has taken up the mantle in the south like Banbury , It was an international stock yard , Worcester sort of fills the gap but lacks the clout , (streaming services etc ) , H&H do a good job in the North , a huge gap for a central pedigree sheep and cattle base , down here with interested auctioneers and a "will do" attitude
 
Large markets are here to stay and are very efficient as there are customers for everything. In the South east we now only have two markets.

Ashford which sells several thousand sheep every week plus nowadays a lot more cattle and cows, it is close to the Motorway and very accessible for buyers and sellers from anywhere in the south and east of England.
While there are no large abattoirs within 150 miles, luckily the smaller places around London are good supporters, with two that do exports on a smaller scale than the big operators.

Hailsham would come under the smaller category but is very important to the farmers in the immediate catchment area. It sells an increasing number of sheep as deadweight selling is difficult when abattoirs are so far away. It sells a good number of store cattle every week, this week over 400. It desperately needs a new (young) auctioneer if anyone knows of one. It is at present a centre town site but there are plans to move it outside in the next few months.

Those markets that are selling less than a thousand sheep or 250 cattle a week are not likely to survive the increasing amount of regulation and the costs involved.
 

andybk

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Mendips Somerset
Sedgemoor and Frome are the only survivors in this part of the world. Markets at. Winford opposite the Prince of Waterloo then down the road at Avon Livestock Centre, Keynsham, Highbridge, Bridgewater, Taunton, Yeovil, Farington Gurney and Chippenham, all markets I have known now gone.
Oh the ham rolls the old landlady used to make in there were , prob the best ive ever had , dry aged ham , salad and huge dark chewy rolls ,
to be fair most of those markets amalgamated into sedge a huge catchment from gloucester to cornwall use it , shame auctioneers dont court the pedigree market more, huge potential with wales not far and on the motorway
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

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“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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