RT Inspector

Bertram

Member
Here we go again. So in their latest bout of fu*kwittery the world's most incompetent organisation, the NSF, has just informed me that my new inspector is actually my neighbour.

Whether or not we get along as neighbours isn't really the point, but ineveitably there would be times when you might not want your nieghbour knowing every detail of your business and poking into every corner of the farm. There may be "history" over all sorts of things going back for years which could affect the impartiality of the audit. Surely they send an inspector from outside the area? They always used to.

Am I being unreasonable in expecting this?
 

Werzle

Member
Location
Midlands
Here we go again. So in their latest bout of fu*kwittery the world's most incompetent organisation, the NSF, has just informed me that my new inspector is actually my neighbour.

Whether or not we get along as neighbours isn't really the point, but ineveitably there would be times when you might not want your nieghbour knowing every detail of your business and poking into every corner of the farm. There may be "history" over all sorts of things going back for years which could affect the impartiality of the audit. Surely they send an inspector from outside the area? They always used to.

Am I being unreasonable in expecting this?
He is probably thinking the same, not unreasonable to expect you to ask for another inspector. I wouldnt allow it.
 

CornishTone

Member
BASIS
Location
Cornwall
As my grandfather always said, "Never upset your neighbours. They're harder to get rid of than a wife!" I'd demand another inspector and let RT know that it's completely unreasonable to have someone that close have so much power over your business. Then explain to your neighbour that it's because you want to remain on good terms that you've asked for someone else. RT are barstewards for putting you in that position IMO!

Edit: RT are barstewards full stop!
 
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farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
Here we go again. So in their latest bout of fu*kwittery the world's most incompetent organisation, the NSF, has just informed me that my new inspector is actually my neighbour.

Whether or not we get along as neighbours isn't really the point, but ineveitably there would be times when you might not want your nieghbour knowing every detail of your business and poking into every corner of the farm. There may be "history" over all sorts of things going back for years which could affect the impartiality of the audit. Surely they send an inspector from outside the area? They always used to.

Am I being unreasonable in expecting this?
I will not be the only one who has sometimes found this to be more of a benefit that a hindrance... however if you are not happen with the choice I think it reasonable to raise your objections and insist there is a genuine conflict of interest and insist on a different inspector.
 

Col555

Member
Location
Cumbria
After foot and mouth in 2001 after our farm was culled out I somehow ended up doing 3 years as a fabbl inspector. I’m glad to be back on the farming side now, but back then I never booked appointments with someone I knew as a friend or neighbour, I just swapped it with other inspectors..I took their conflicting interest farms in return. I’m surprised he hasn’t passed it on to another inspector tbh. Just makes it awkward for both parties if there’s a major n/c
 

farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
In my experience most if not all agricultural inspectors are failed farmers as that is why they needed this revenue stream.
Failed is perhaps a strong term? In my experience they are often from smaller farms where an inspection job can fit in alongside their farming operations and bring in better income than renting more land for a few more head of livestock.
 

shumungus

Member
Livestock Farmer
Failed is perhaps a strong term? In my experience they are often from smaller farms where an inspection job can fit in alongside their farming operations and bring in better income than renting more land for a few more head of livestock.
Nope, failed is a fair term. Plenty of farmers started off with nothing and have made a go of it. If they want to subsidise their inefficient practices with a second job, that's fine plenty do. Or maybe their hearts not truly in the farming to make a go of it, thats fine also, each to their own.
But neither scenario qualifies them in any way to walk onto a farm being run by someone who has it as a full time occupation and is using its profits to keep a house/family and expand a business solely on its own.
Those that can, do.
Those that can't, teach.
Those that can do neither................audit.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Nope, failed is a fair term. Plenty of farmers started off with nothing and have made a go of it. If they want to subsidise their inefficient practices with a second job, that's fine plenty do. Or maybe their hearts not truly in the farming to make a go of it, thats fine also, each to their own.
But neither scenario qualifies them in any way to walk onto a farm being run by someone who has it as a full time occupation and is using its profits to keep a house/family and expand a business solely on its own.
Those that can, do.
Those that can't, teach.
Those that can do neither................audit.

Or maybe they just don't define success as taking on ever more debt getting more acres in order to wave a big willy? :censored: That would be especially likely if, like many in the industry, they have no successors to take the debt on after they've put themselves in an early grave.

Just saying. ;)
 
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Here we go again. So in their latest bout of fu*kwittery the world's most incompetent organisation, the NSF, has just informed me that my new inspector is actually my neighbour.

Whether or not we get along as neighbours isn't really the point, but ineveitably there would be times when you might not want your nieghbour knowing every detail of your business and poking into every corner of the farm. There may be "history" over all sorts of things going back for years which could affect the impartiality of the audit. Surely they send an inspector from outside the area? They always used to.

Am I being unreasonable in expecting this?
No way are you being unreasonable in not wanting this. Mind you, I refused to have my new neighbour as my milk recorder.
 

Bald Rick

Moderator
Livestock Farmer
Location
Anglesey
Nope, failed is a fair term. Plenty of farmers started off with nothing and have made a go of it. If they want to subsidise their inefficient practices with a second job, that's fine plenty do. Or maybe their hearts not truly in the farming to make a go of it, thats fine also, each to their own.
But neither scenario qualifies them in any way to walk onto a farm being run by someone who has it as a full time occupation and is using its profits to keep a house/family and expand a business solely on its own.
Those that can, do.
Those that can't, teach.
Those that can do neither................audit.

You could say exactly the same for any source of income outside of your main farming sector ….. diversification, wife on the job, relief milking etc.
Everyone needs to earn a crust

But I agree that neighbour should not inspect neighbour. Oh the pub tales they could tell
 

shumungus

Member
Livestock Farmer
Or maybe they just don't define success as taking on ever more debt getting more acres in order to wave a big willy? :censored: That would especially likely if, like many in the industry, they have no successors to take the debt on after they've put themselves in an early grave.

Just saying. ;)
Wrap it up anyway you want, but let me put it another way. There are people in this industry and if they talk, you listen, as there will be wisdom and experience to learn from. How many times have you thought this of a clipboard wielding inspector?
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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