Micro nutrients

casemx 270

Member
Location
East midlands
Working on the basis that a healthy crop is the best way forward I hear of people using mirco nutrients on their crops thinking mainly of wheat and osr what products do you use and can you actually see a difference between treated and non treated to justify the application ? Currently we do use manganese and boron also sulphur
 
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snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
A lot of micronutrients applied are probably not necessary. Having said that if you have a known historical deficiency then there is every justification. Often the relatively low cost of micronutrients is good insurance.

We apply Mn as we have known issues and Mg as our high calcium soils can restrict Mg uptake. I've never seen a yield increase from tramline trials of anything else here, probably not even Mn and Mg, but we can loose large patches to Mn so there is some underlying issue (high pH).
 

teslacoils

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Ive been applying Nutrel KMan plus. Historically, yes you can tell. But at wheat @£130 it was never a profitable application. Now wheat is £300 is may be moreso. As with all these tonics, the money is better spent importing FYM etc first. In short, there are better things to optimise in the first place.
 
As with all these tonics, the money is better spent importing FYM etc first


Any generalised fertiliser should have micro nutrients in, so applying Biosolds, Compost, FYM, Chicken muck, Digestate etc.

Would be nice for HMG to actually practice what they preach and ensure human waste is spread back on the land in a decent form rather than chucking it in rivers. All mouth no trousers IMHO.
 

casemx 270

Member
Location
East midlands
Any generalised fertiliser should have micro nutrients in, so applying Biosolds, Compost, FYM, Chicken muck, Digestate etc.

Would be nice for HMG to actually practice what they preach and ensure human waste is spread back on the land in a decent form rather than chucking it in rivers. All mouth no trousers IMHO.
So we apply biosolids would that help ? But is that readily available to the plant ?
 

robbie

Member
BASIS
Over the years ive built up a picture of what I need to apply from periodic tissue testing.
Manganese is a given up to T1, mag is used and needed from TO to T3 because of light high pH soils. I use cu and Zn but am seeing less need for cu and more Zn.
 

teslacoils

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Theres a difference between soil applied and crop uptake. Frequently we find that during peak growth the crop is short of something or other. But it rarely makes economic sense to apply unless something is well out of whack with the soil.
 
So we apply biosolids would that help ? But is that readily available to the plant ?

What is analysed in manures/slurries and what is available to a plant in the soil may not be the same. Generally, if you are applying biosolids and the like to land, you will gradually get raised indices and better and better crops. But this won't eliminate things like a known copper deficiency or something like high iron in the soil which might cause another element to be locked up.

Soil foods and plant/leaf foods each have a place. I used to use manganese (combined nitrate and sulphate product), yaras Magphos K and a phosphate product whose name escapes me. I know a number of forum users use things like uplift, gramitrel and brassitrel which are slightly different products but all good stuff.

Beware anyone telling you can apply X to the soil and magically make it all perfect for plants. Doesn't work that way.
 

casemx 270

Member
Location
East midlands
What is analysed in manures/slurries and what is available to a plant in the soil may not be the same. Generally, if you are applying biosolids and the like to land, you will gradually get raised indices and better and better crops. But this won't eliminate things like a known copper deficiency or something like high iron in the soil which might cause another element to be locked up.

Soil foods and plant/leaf foods each have a place. I used to use manganese (combined nitrate and sulphate product), yaras Magphos K and a phosphate product whose name escapes me. I know a number of forum users use things like uplift, gramitrel and brassitrel which are slightly different products but all good stuff.

Beware anyone telling you can apply X to the soil and magically make it all perfect for plants. Doesn't work that way.
Yeah this is where I m coming from.my employer thinks that because our soils have a regular supply of biosolids and test high that this is then readily available to the crop .So we use manganese but I can see other things would help but he can't .
 

teslacoils

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Test soil, test leaves, test grain, then do some more testing! Saves a fortune! I routinely use Mg, mn and Zn. Testing highlights if cu is a concern. Tinkering with B and Mo.

Test with and without. Soil tests plenty of K. Even absolutely bucketing on foliar Ive never met peak demand. Target scarce resources where they will make the best return.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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