Neat Hedges

Martin Holden

Member
Grassland Exhibitor
Location
Cheltenham
I guess whatever strategy increases biomass is the right thing to do - wonder itv there is any proper research on this ? everyone seems fixated on trees but increasing the sequester efficiency of millions of miles of existing hedges could surely be a big easy climate win for farmers potentially ?
What happened to the work being trialled on engine exhaust fumes being blown into the drills when drilling cereals and other crops? I thought that had some legs?
 

Clive

Staff Member
NFFN Member
Location
Lichfield
What happened to the work being trialled on engine exhaust fumes being blown into the drills when drilling cereals and other crops? I thought that had some legs?

yes that was an interesting one - not only from a C point of view but I'm sure I read that soil stick less to warmer metal ?

would be easy to pipe the exhaust into a drill fan cowl surely?
 
I've seen land where the hedges have not been cut for two decades or more. They encroach on fields and that costs time and money to sort out.

Got to do the sides every so often or it becomes a big job to sort them out. For the livestock men there is also the issue of keeping them stockproof and being able to get at fences.

It's a good job I've never been out in a hedgetrimmer as I would do the job as fast as practical and not give a hoot about the result so long as it was cut back decent- it will only grow back anyway.
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
I've seen land where the hedges have not been cut for two decades or more. They encroach on fields and that costs time and money to sort out.

Got to do the sides every so often or it becomes a big job to sort them out. For the livestock men there is also the issue of keeping them stockproof and being able to get at fences.

It's a good job I've never been out in a hedgetrimmer as I would do the job as fast as practical and not give a hoot about the result so long as it was cut back decent- it will only grow back anyway.
I just rag it off , shite job , bored by lunchtime
 

essexpete

Member
Location
Essex
Tricky balance. I have a lot of hedge in proportion to land area and have come to the conclusion that regular yearly trimming works best for me.
It has been suggested that I ought to leave some uncut each year to allow the fruit to form a winter bird food supply. The problem is to achieve that would require leaving a hedge uncut for 3 growing seasons. The result of that, I find, leaves a more open hedge and more smashed and damaged following that 3rd season flail. I also find that my old machine suffers less wear and tear on light growth. In the spring hedge regrowth is rapid when the autumn flail is less severe.
The hedges seem to provide good bird summer habitat and are more stock proof. I have left some large hawthorns to run into large tree-like bushes, particularly where there are not any other trees. Just my opinion.
 
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Cowmansam

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Shropshire
we managed some near our yard that are predominantly holly differently and have only cut sides for 20years now - they are many times the biomass they were, gone for maybe 1.5m-2m tall to 15-20m tall and home to a lot more birdlife I'm sure
they still look tidy but that extra biomass must be good environmentally
Holly is different though as it’s hollow in the center
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
Got to do the sides every so often or it becomes a big job to sort them out. For the livestock men there is also the issue of keeping them stockproof and being able to get at fences.
Most hedges need fences as well in modern times livestock management.
A 'lambing' field or any field when the weather is wild is far better ime , with a decent wind break , and i like them to have shade in the full sun.
Basic stockmanship.
 

primmiemoo

Member
Location
Devon
Tricky balance. I have a lot of hedge in proportion to land area and have come to the conclusion that regular yearly trimming works best for me.
It has been suggested that I ought to leave some uncut each year to allow the fruit to form a winter bird food supply. The problem is to achieve that would require leaving a hedge uncut for 3 growing seasons. The result of that, I find, leaves a more open hedge and, after a 3rd growing season, more smashed and damaged following a 3rd season flail. I also find that my old machine suffers less wear and tear on light growth. In the spring hedge regrowth is rapid when the autumn flail is less severe.
The hedges seem to provide good bird summer habitat and are more stock proof. I have left some large hawthorns to run into large tree-like bushes, particularly where there are not any other trees. Just my opinion.

Yet the old rotation of steeping gives a great mixture of stages of growth, crops of fuel, and a beautiful mosaic of feeding and breeding opportunities for insects and birds.
They shouldn't need flailing at all beyond the lightest of touches to keep the bases from encroaching and fences clear. The old fingerbeam mowers did excellent work to achieve that.
 

essexpete

Member
Location
Essex
Yet the old rotation of steeping gives a great mixture of stages of growth, crops of fuel, and a beautiful mosaic of feeding and breeding opportunities for insects and birds.
They shouldn't need flailing at all beyond the lightest of touches to keep the bases from encroaching and fences clear. The old fingerbeam mowers did excellent work to achieve that.
I had to trim some of our track side hedges this year during the summer as access was too restricted. I actually used my old disc mower just of the vertical. Worked well on light growth and those parts look the best now.
 

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AHDB planting and variety survey

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The AHDB Planting and Variety Survey provides the earliest view of the planted area for the upcoming harvest in the United Kingdom (UK).​


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The survey will estimate the area of cereals and oilseed rape intended for harvest in 2022 in the UK. It aims to assess the varietal composition of wheat, barley, oats and oilseed rape crops in the UK. The results of this survey will allow the industry to quantify domestic production, at a time when food security is more important than ever.
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