Soil test

glensman

Member
Location
North Antrim
Just got soil tests back on a field I'm reseeding. We are a hill farm so land is average quality, the field has been cut once a year for silage and had a coat of manure (sheep bedding) afterwards for the last 5 or 6 years. The results are as follows.
Ph 5.8 guideline 6.0 slightly low
Phosphorus 18 guideline 16 normal
Potassium 90 guideline 121 low
Magnesium 232 guideline 51 very high

Why would the magnesium be so high and what effect would that have on grass coupled with low potassium?
 

Sir loin

Member
Location
North Yorkshire
look at the thread
I asked the same question
 

Wombat

Member
Location
East yorks
Just got soil tests back on a field I'm reseeding. We are a hill farm so land is average quality, the field has been cut once a year for silage and had a coat of manure (sheep bedding) afterwards for the last 5 or 6 years. The results are as follows.
Ph 5.8 guideline 6.0 slightly low
Phosphorus 18 guideline 16 normal
Potassium 90 guideline 121 low
Magnesium 232 guideline 51 very high

Why would the magnesium be so high and what effect would that have on grass coupled with low potassium?

Magnesium is normally a characteristics of how heavy and sticky the soil is.

Most of ours are 800 plus so i wouldn't worry about 252
 
Location
Ceredigion
Those mag levels are not massively high , but Gypsum is commonly used in high mag soils that will help In nutrient lock up, but if bigger concern is the low K level that is common when fields are cut every year, low potash levels also make the forage more prone to drought
 
Lot depends on how much production you are aiming for
Because your P is OK I would go for equal amounts of N & K Probably not a compound that does that so 2 bags nitram or similar & 1 bag MOP
 

Bald n Grumpy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Magnesium levels here not quite as high as yours but been advised recently that they could be interfering with potash up take. Looking into using gypsum probably in liquid form put on with a sprayer. Supposed to help with compaction and cultivations as well
 

NI agri-food stakeholder groups discuss climate change bill with committee

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The Livestock and Meat Commission (LMC) recently submitted oral evidence to members of the Stormont Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (AERA) committee on the content and potential impact of the Northern Ireland Climate Change Bill (No.2).

This draft legislation was recently introduced to the Northern Ireland Assembly by the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) in conjunction with agriculture minister, Edwin Poots.

“We were accompanied by representatives from a wide range of food industry bodies, including the Northern Ireland Meat Exporters’ Association,the Ulster Farmers’ Union [UFU], Northern...
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