Tractor hp options

Against_the_grain

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
S.E
Why do manufacturers give such a range of horsepower on tractors that have the same engines/transmissions etc. For example the case magnum / nh T8 rangegoes from 250 to 380 with as far as I am aware exactly the same components. It presumably doesn't cost any more to get it to the higher power so why even offer the smaller power?
 
Why do manufacturers give such a range of horsepower on tractors that have the same engines/transmissions etc. For example the case magnum / nh T8 rangegoes from 250 to 380 with as far as I am aware exactly the same components. It presumably doesn't cost any more to get it to the higher power so why even offer the smaller power?
Fuel consumption .
 

Frankzy

Member
Location
Jamtland, Sweden
Gearbox components, shafts, bearings and pistons are all things that could be of differing ratings even on otherwise identical tractors.

It presumably doesn't cost any more to get it to the higher power so why even offer the smaller power?
It's called price discrimination, an essentially identical product, from the manufacturers point of view, is provided at different price levels to get those who can pay more for the product to do so.

One really good example is Tesla.
You can spec a Tesla with a battery capacity of 100, 90, 75 etc, but all three of those models will be equipped with a 100 kwh battery because it's cheaper to make one kind of battery rather than three. The lower speced ones are simply limited via software..
 
Last edited:

dave mountain

Member
Livestock Farmer
Warranty costs. On average the lower horsepower models of the same range will suffer less breakdowns. In addition there will be other differences, the wheels and tyres will be different, drawbar & linkage lift will be different etc.
 

Barleycorn

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Hampshire
Watch out, we bought a Case 115, promised that it was the same transmission as the 130, so they fueled it up to 130. Clutch packs went, apparently 115 has smaller clutch packs. Think they swung it on warranty though, can't remember.
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Not all the components are the same inside. The smaller models may have the same chassis, engine blocks etc but the internals will sometimes be different. The example above of different clutch plates is a good one. When engines are bought in from a 3rd party then often they are just derated to match the desired output.

It's a balance between tooling costs on the production lines and the pricing points in a competitive market.
 

rusty

Member
I bought a John Deere 6145R instead of a 6155R as it was about 4K cheaper and could see nothing different in the specs apart from the horse power. I can get it remapped by Derv Doctor for £850 . When I spoke to him he said he could see no difference in the software between the 2 models so the only difference maybe the sticker on the bonnet.
 

Farma Parma

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
In the Dyke Back
6485 larger frame massey has less clutch packs in the PTO drive line i was told years ago over its bigger hp brother the 6495 same engine, but essentially identical trans if in D6 or VT spec.
thats just one thing but am sure there will be similar stories on other brands.
 

Farma Parma

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
In the Dyke Back
I bought a John Deere 6145R instead of a 6155R as it was about 4K cheaper and could see nothing different in the specs apart from the horse power. I can get it remapped by Derv Doctor for £850 . When I spoke to him he said he could see no difference in the software between the 2 models so the only difference maybe the sticker on the bonnet.
i dont know why as a min there isnt 25hp between models who is bothered nowerdays for 10/15hp increases
 

Farma Parma

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
In the Dyke Back
Watch out, we bought a Case 115, promised that it was the same transmission as the 130, so they fueled it up to 130. Clutch packs went, apparently 115 has smaller clutch packs. Think they swung it on warranty though, can't remember.
Best advice ignor what salesmen say & just buy the biggest you can afford but preferably biggest in the range & leave well alone.
 

dowcow

Member
Location
Lancashire
There might also be difference in radiator sizes and fluid capacities, along with filter sizes and servicing costs with higher power models. I would have thought a tractor running at 380 rather than 250 would use different injectors and fuel pumps too.
 

adam_farming

Member
Location
Suffolk
When in the US I noticed more lower-range models around than over here, for example JD 8R series, over here would be mostly 8360R/8370R whereas I think I saw most of the range at one point or another over there, for example we had an 8295R and 8320R on grain chasers.

Is it right to think that having a lower range model would be more reliable on some parts than the top of the range?
Sticking with a JD example, they have a 6250R, 7250R and 8245R all putting out (near enough) the same power but through different frames. The 6250R is top of the range so in theory everything is at or near it's limits, whereas the 8245R is only putting 250hp through the same frame as an 8400R, so assuming that at least some common parts, they only have two thirds of the power and strain so should last longer? Same I guess with Fendt, having 724, 824 and 924, all 240hp but through different frame sizes.

I know there's a lot more to it than this like weight, transmissions available etc but its something I've often thought about.

It would be interesting to compare prices too, so what is the cheapest way to buy a 250hp John Deere, 6, 7 or 8R?
 

adam_farming

Member
Location
Suffolk
There was a comparison of the 6250R and 7250R in Farmers Weekly a while ago. The 7250R was a few grand more expensive but it was hard to compare like with like as both machines had different transmissions. https://www.fwi.co.uk/machinery/tractors/video-on-test-john-deere-6250r-v-7250r
Another in depth scientific machinery test from the yellow peril :facepalm: The 7R had an £11k weight package which JD "have only sold 1 in the UK so far" so prices excluding that weren't far different really, certainly within 10%.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

  • 489
  • 0


Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
Top