Older self propelled sprayers

Chrisw

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Cornwall
Hi all,
After your thoughts and experiences of self propelled sprayers. I feel its time for me to upgrade my sprayranger, partly because I want a bigger tank (3000l+), slightly more ground clearance (want to go hydrostatic) as we have brought osr into the rotation, and I feel like a change. Have had the alanco for 8 years and it has been a superb cheap to run sprayer, and hoping I can find a hydro that will be as good and reliable.
Age range of 2000-2006 ish, and a fairly tight budget, and preferably not sky high hours like the batemans I'd that age.
What are your recommendations and thoughts please?
 

D14

Member
Hi all,
After your thoughts and experiences of self propelled sprayers. I feel its time for me to upgrade my sprayranger, partly because I want a bigger tank (3000l+), slightly more ground clearance (want to go hydrostatic) as we have brought osr into the rotation, and I feel like a change. Have had the alanco for 8 years and it has been a superb cheap to run sprayer, and hoping I can find a hydro that will be as good and reliable.
Age range of 2000-2006 ish, and a fairly tight budget, and preferably not sky high hours like the batemans I'd that age.
What are your recommendations and thoughts please?

Hours on a bateman aren't as critical as you think. Its mainly wheel motors which yes are expensive but once done are good for at least 5000 hours and a chassis pin and bush. If you factor those things into the purchase then its safe money especially if you get into something like a RB25 as it won't depreciate any more really or a newer RB26/35 if you can find one. Whats the budget?
 

KB6930

Member
Location
Borders
If you're fairly hilly try a hydrostatic first we went from agribuggy to a Househam and it's bloody hopeless on hills .

It won't climb and feels very unsafe coming down anything steep.

I know folk with Bateman and they're happy with them
 

Chrisw

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Cornwall
Cheers for the replies so far. Our fields are fairly small so the up and down drags aren't very long, it's more that the sprayer needs to be stable going across the hills (hillmaster combine so we cut across the slopes not up and down).
Looked at multidrive and like it, but the axles would likely be too low when dedicating rape to be much higher than the sprayranger on its row crops. The hydrostatic sprayers seem to have the best crop clearance, but went and looked at a chafer mirage 2 and it's nice, but seems too high on 48 inch rowcrops to be stable across a slope.
Like the look of bateman but very strong money for 11k+ hours. Thinking possibly Sands as well. CASE SP3000? Knight sp? Not heard much good about househam
 

Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
Cheers for the replies so far. Our fields are fairly small so the up and down drags aren't very long, it's more that the sprayer needs to be stable going across the hills (hillmaster combine so we cut across the slopes not up and down).
Looked at multidrive and like it, but the axles would likely be too low when dedicating rape to be much higher than the sprayranger on its row crops. The hydrostatic sprayers seem to have the best crop clearance, but went and looked at a chafer mirage 2 and it's nice, but seems too high on 48 inch rowcrops to be stable across a slope.
Like the look of bateman but very strong money for 11k+ hours. Thinking possibly Sands as well. CASE SP3000? Knight sp? Not heard much good about househam
I have Househams and like them a lot. I have three from a Sprint to a Spirit and have never had problems. Personally i wouldn’t look at anything else although i never have needed to look at anything else.
 

Drillman

Member
Mixed Farmer
Cheers for the replies so far. Our fields are fairly small so the up and down drags aren't very long, it's more that the sprayer needs to be stable going across the hills (hillmaster combine so we cut across the slopes not up and down).
Looked at multidrive and like it, but the axles would likely be too low when dedicating rape to be much higher than the sprayranger on its row crops. The hydrostatic sprayers seem to have the best crop clearance, but went and looked at a chafer mirage 2 and it's nice, but seems too high on 48 inch rowcrops to be stable across a slope.
Like the look of bateman but very strong money for 11k+ hours. Thinking possibly Sands as well. CASE SP3000? Knight sp? Not heard much good about househam
Trust me the multi has a lot more ground clearance than the sprayranger
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
Cheers for the replies so far. Our fields are fairly small so the up and down drags aren't very long, it's more that the sprayer needs to be stable going across the hills (hillmaster combine so we cut across the slopes not up and down).
Looked at multidrive and like it, but the axles would likely be too low when dedicating rape to be much higher than the sprayranger on its row crops. The hydrostatic sprayers seem to have the best crop clearance, but went and looked at a chafer mirage 2 and it's nice, but seems too high on 48 inch rowcrops to be stable across a slope.
Like the look of bateman but very strong money for 11k+ hours. Thinking possibly Sands as well. CASE SP3000? Knight sp? Not heard much good about househam
Drove a 2013 Knight 1835 for a season and she was lovely and one of the best sprayers I’d ever driven on very high hours too!
They all have their niggles, hydraulic pipes blowing every so often, even mechanical ones have their fair share of problems!
Personally I’d go RB16/25
 

Chrisw

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Cornwall
If you're fairly hilly try a hydrostatic first we went from agribuggy to a Househam and it's bloody hopeless on hills .

It won't climb and feels very unsafe coming down anything steep.

I know folk with Bateman and they're happy with them
Do you mean climbing up hills it is useless or it isnt very stable going across slopes, or both?
 

Chrisw

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Cornwall
Drove a 2013 Knight 1835 for a season and she was lovely and one of the best sprayers I’d ever driven on very high hours too!
They all have their niggles, hydraulic pipes blowing every so often, even mechanical ones have their fair share of problems!
Personally I’d go RB16/25
I do like the look of the knight 1835. Finding one within or near budget is tricky. They seem to be very well spec'd
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
I do like the look of the knight 1835. Finding one within or near budget is tricky. They seem to be very well spec'd
Yes and very often on Veg work… the controls are very quick and easy to work out and the toggle switch allowing 18 functions from a 6 button joystick is an amazing function. Only downside with the knights is resale value and fuel tank not big enough in my opinion…
 

Chrisw

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Cornwall
Yes and very often on Veg work… the controls are very quick and easy to work out and the toggle switch allowing 18 functions from a 6 button joystick is an amazing function. Only downside with the knights is resale value and fuel tank not big enough in my opinion…
Resale seems as good as most other ones. Found one 2007 knight for £26k and a 2008 for 37k! Unfortunately they are both out of budget
 

eagleye

Member
Location
co down
put the wheel track out to 78" or 2m stableas anything across hills, we select low gear for hills and hydrostatic seems ok. its an old DDB (taken over by Househam) 1986 model refurbished 2018 with gps auto section control etc. few pipes go - hydraulics, but we replaced a few in hard to get at places like under engine and tank when we can. no idea of hours now but sprays over 1000ha a year according to the control info (teejet radion)
 

35% of English and Welsh farmers possibly/probably depressed

  • 273
  • 6
Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) has today, Thursday, October 14, published the findings of The Big Farming Survey, which shows 35% of English and Welsh farmers are either possibly or probably depressed.

The survey, based on over 15,000 responses, concentrates on the health and well-being of the farming community in England and Wales in the 2020s.

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) is a national charity that provides support to the farming community across England and Wales.

Mental health​


Mental well-being, the survey notes, describes our ability to cope with the ‘ups and downs’ of everyday life.

According to the survey, 14% of the farming community is ‘possibly depressed’ while...
Top